AND YOU THINK YOUR HUG MAKES UP FOR SLAPPING ME ACROSS THE FACE?

Some things hugs can’t fix: Parental warmth does not remove anxiety that follows punishment

A loving mom can’t overcome the anxiety and aggression caused by corporal punishment, and her otherwise warm demeanor may make it worse, according to research led by Duke University that was recently published in the Journal of Clinical Child & Adolescent Psychology.

 “If you believe that you can shake your children or slap them across the face and then smooth things over gradually by smothering them with love, you are mistaken,” wrote lead researcher Jennifer E. Lansford on the Child and Family Blog.  Lansford is a research professor at the Social Science Research Institute at Duke University.  “Being very warm with a child whom you hit in this manner rarely makes things better.  It can make a child more, not less, anxious.”

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Is Face-to-Face Bullying Worse Than Cyberbullying?

Face-to-face bullying is more cruel and harsh than online attacks, a survey of school students found. The findings of this study indicate that significantly more victims perceived traditional bullying to be more harsh and cruel than cyberbullying. “It clearly indicates the feelings of the children and the very real threat they have of being physically harmed by another child,” the lead investigator said.

The study showed 59 percent of the children participants felt face-to-face bullying was worse for them than being cyberbullied.  Twenty-six per cent reported that both forms of bullying were equally hurtful and the remaining 15 per cent perceived cyberbullying to be worse.

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Bullying May Have Lasting Health Effects on Kids

Kids who are picked on by their peers may see lasting effects on their physical and mental well-being — especially if the bullying is allowed to persist for years, a new study suggests.

The study found that kids who are chronically bullied seem to fare the worst:  Those continually picked on from fifth grade to 10th grade had the lowest scores on measures of physical and emotional health.  Kids who were bullied at a younger age but saw the problem fade tended to do better.  But they were still worse off than their peers who’d never been victimized.

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Childhood Abuses: Sometimes emotional more harmful than sexual or physical

I can identify with this article, as I too was emotionally and sexually abused.  Because of the sexual abuse, I’m still pondering if the emotional abuse would have still taken place or if that was the reason.  My mother was toxic, what spewed out of her mouth was hurtful, undeserved and damaging;  I still hear those words in my mind today.  ~~ Deb

Children who are emotionally abused and neglected face similar and sometimes worse mental health problems as children who are physically or sexually abused, yet psychological abuse is rarely addressed in prevention programs or in treating victims, according to a new study published by the American Psychological Association.

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Autistic Facial Characteristics Identified

I was researching to find out if there were facial characteristics identified in autistic children and found these two studies.

The face and brain develop in coordination, with each influencing the other, beginning in the embryo and continuing through adolescence.  Now, University of Missouri researchers have found distinct differences between the facial characteristics of children with autism compared to those of typically developing children.  This knowledge could help researchers understand the origins of autism. This article was in (ScienceDaily in Oct. 20, 2011) —.

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New Criteria May Reduce Autism Diagnoses

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In (Reuters Health) – January 23/14 – They reported the number of U.S. kids diagnosed with autism has been on the rise, but that trend could turn around with new diagnostic criteria coming into effect, researchers say.

By applying the new symptom checklist to 6,577 children who already met the old definitions for autism and related disorders, the study team found about 19 percent of the kids would not get an autism diagnosis today.

“Parents have no reason to be concerned about the findings of this study which is not about re-diagnosing people or taking away their diagnoses,” Dr. Brian King told Reuters Health in an email.

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Risk Factors in Personality Disorders

More women than men develop borderline personality disorder. But men are much more likely than women to have antisocial personality disorder and obsessive-compulsive personality disorder (OCD).

Other risk factors for personality disorders include:

~ A history of childhood verbal, physical or sexual abuse

~ A family history of schizophrenia

~ A family history of personality disorders

~ A childhood head injury

~ An unstable family life

Source for this article:  MayoClinic.com

HUFFING ~~ Is Your Child At Risk?

Huffing is sometimes used as a generic term for any type of inhalant abuse.

Huffing, sniffing or bagging causes a sense of euphoria that lasts about 15 to 30 minutes.  For many kids, inhalants provide a cheap and accessible alternative to alcohol.  The initial euphoria of huffing, may be followed by dizziness, slurred speech, and loss of coordination, inhibition and control.  Hallucinations and delusions are possible. MayoClinic.com

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In the Dubois County Free Press, it was reported that an auto crash was a possible factor that claimed two lives.

It was early morning when two cars collided, and both drivers had to be extricated from their vehicles.  The accident is still under investigation but the sheriff’s department stated they suspect one of the drivers of inhaling compressed air (huffing).

Migraine in Children May Affect School Performance

ScienceDaily (Oct. 29, 2012) — Children with migraine are more likely to have below average school performance than kids who do not have headaches, according to new research published in the October 30, 2012, print issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology.

The study of 5,671 Brazilian children ages 5 to 12 found that those with migraine were 30 percent more likely to have below average school performance than those with no headaches.

“Studies have looked at the burden of migraine for adolescents, but less work has been done to determine the effect of migraine on younger children,” said study author Marcelo E. Bigal, MD, PhD, of Merck & Co. in Whitehouse Station, New Jersey, and a member of the American Academy of Neurology.

For the study, the students’ teachers provided information on students’ performance that was the same information provided to educational boards. Teachers also completed a validated questionnaire screening for emotional and behavioral problems and interviewed parents with a questionnaire covering medical history, headaches and other information.

The study found that 0.6 percent of the children had chronic migraine, or migraine on 15 or more days per month, 9 percent had episodic migraine, and 17.6 percent had probable migraine, which meant they met all but one of the criteria for migraine and did not meet the full criteria for any other type of headache syndrome.

The link between migraine and poor performance in school was even stronger for children with migraines that were more severe, lasted longer, or for children with chronic migraine, as well as for those who also had emotional or behavioral problems.

“With approximately one-fourth of school-age children having headaches with migraine features, this is a serious problem, especially for those with frequent, severe attacks that do not subside quickly,” Bigal said. “Parents and teachers need to take these headaches seriously and make sure children get appropriate medical attention and treatment.”

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/10/121029170810.htm

Health Tip: When Your Child is Stressed

(HealthDay News) – April 20, 2012Stress is a fact of life, and children are no less immune than their parents.

How can you recognize if your child is “stressed out?” The American Academy of Pediatrics mentions these possible warning signs:

  • Having physical problems, such as stomach ache or headache.
  • Appearing agitated, tired or restless.
  • Seeming depressed and unwilling to talk about his or her feelings.
  • Losing interest in activities and wanting to stay at home.
  • Acting irritable or negative.
  • Participating less at school, possibly including slipping grades.
  • Exhibiting antisocial behavior (stealing or lying), avoiding chores or becoming increasingly dependent on his or her parents.

Copyright © 2012 HealthDay. All rights reserved.

http://health.yahoo.net/news/s/hsn/health-tip-when-your-child-is-stressed