ADD and ADHD in Children Slideshow

I found this on (WebMd.com) site explaining this disorder in a slideshow presentation on ADD & ADHD in children.

http://www.webmd.com/add-adhd/childhood-adhd/ss/slideshow-adhd-in-children

Should you wish to continue with another slideshow, they present ADHD in Adults

http://www.webmd.com/add-adhd/ss/slideshow-adhd-in-adults

AND YOU THINK YOUR HUG MAKES UP FOR SLAPPING ME ACROSS THE FACE?

Some things hugs can’t fix: Parental warmth does not remove anxiety that follows punishment

A loving mom can’t overcome the anxiety and aggression caused by corporal punishment, and her otherwise warm demeanor may make it worse, according to research led by Duke University that was recently published in the Journal of Clinical Child & Adolescent Psychology.

 “If you believe that you can shake your children or slap them across the face and then smooth things over gradually by smothering them with love, you are mistaken,” wrote lead researcher Jennifer E. Lansford on the Child and Family Blog.  Lansford is a research professor at the Social Science Research Institute at Duke University.  “Being very warm with a child whom you hit in this manner rarely makes things better.  It can make a child more, not less, anxious.”

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Is Face-to-Face Bullying Worse Than Cyberbullying?

Face-to-face bullying is more cruel and harsh than online attacks, a survey of school students found. The findings of this study indicate that significantly more victims perceived traditional bullying to be more harsh and cruel than cyberbullying. “It clearly indicates the feelings of the children and the very real threat they have of being physically harmed by another child,” the lead investigator said.

The study showed 59 percent of the children participants felt face-to-face bullying was worse for them than being cyberbullied.  Twenty-six per cent reported that both forms of bullying were equally hurtful and the remaining 15 per cent perceived cyberbullying to be worse.

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Bullying May Have Lasting Health Effects on Kids

Kids who are picked on by their peers may see lasting effects on their physical and mental well-being — especially if the bullying is allowed to persist for years, a new study suggests.

The study found that kids who are chronically bullied seem to fare the worst:  Those continually picked on from fifth grade to 10th grade had the lowest scores on measures of physical and emotional health.  Kids who were bullied at a younger age but saw the problem fade tended to do better.  But they were still worse off than their peers who’d never been victimized.

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Childhood Abuses: Sometimes emotional more harmful than sexual or physical

I can identify with this article, as I too was emotionally and sexually abused.  Because of the sexual abuse, I’m still pondering if the emotional abuse would have still taken place or if that was the reason.  My mother was toxic, what spewed out of her mouth was hurtful, undeserved and damaging;  I still hear those words in my mind today.  ~~ Deb

Children who are emotionally abused and neglected face similar and sometimes worse mental health problems as children who are physically or sexually abused, yet psychological abuse is rarely addressed in prevention programs or in treating victims, according to a new study published by the American Psychological Association.

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Autistic Facial Characteristics Identified

I was researching to find out if there were facial characteristics identified in autistic children and found these two studies.

The face and brain develop in coordination, with each influencing the other, beginning in the embryo and continuing through adolescence.  Now, University of Missouri researchers have found distinct differences between the facial characteristics of children with autism compared to those of typically developing children.  This knowledge could help researchers understand the origins of autism. This article was in (ScienceDaily in Oct. 20, 2011) —.

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New Criteria May Reduce Autism Diagnoses

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In (Reuters Health) – January 23/14 – They reported the number of U.S. kids diagnosed with autism has been on the rise, but that trend could turn around with new diagnostic criteria coming into effect, researchers say.

By applying the new symptom checklist to 6,577 children who already met the old definitions for autism and related disorders, the study team found about 19 percent of the kids would not get an autism diagnosis today.

“Parents have no reason to be concerned about the findings of this study which is not about re-diagnosing people or taking away their diagnoses,” Dr. Brian King told Reuters Health in an email.

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Risk Factors in Personality Disorders

More women than men develop borderline personality disorder. But men are much more likely than women to have antisocial personality disorder and obsessive-compulsive personality disorder (OCD).

Other risk factors for personality disorders include:

~ A history of childhood verbal, physical or sexual abuse

~ A family history of schizophrenia

~ A family history of personality disorders

~ A childhood head injury

~ An unstable family life

Source for this article:  MayoClinic.com

HUFFING ~~ Is Your Child At Risk?

Huffing is sometimes used as a generic term for any type of inhalant abuse.

Huffing, sniffing or bagging causes a sense of euphoria that lasts about 15 to 30 minutes.  For many kids, inhalants provide a cheap and accessible alternative to alcohol.  The initial euphoria of huffing, may be followed by dizziness, slurred speech, and loss of coordination, inhibition and control.  Hallucinations and delusions are possible. MayoClinic.com

~~

In the Dubois County Free Press, it was reported that an auto crash was a possible factor that claimed two lives.

It was early morning when two cars collided, and both drivers had to be extricated from their vehicles.  The accident is still under investigation but the sheriff’s department stated they suspect one of the drivers of inhaling compressed air (huffing).

Migraine in Children May Affect School Performance

ScienceDaily (Oct. 29, 2012) — Children with migraine are more likely to have below average school performance than kids who do not have headaches, according to new research published in the October 30, 2012, print issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology.

The study of 5,671 Brazilian children ages 5 to 12 found that those with migraine were 30 percent more likely to have below average school performance than those with no headaches.

“Studies have looked at the burden of migraine for adolescents, but less work has been done to determine the effect of migraine on younger children,” said study author Marcelo E. Bigal, MD, PhD, of Merck & Co. in Whitehouse Station, New Jersey, and a member of the American Academy of Neurology.

For the study, the students’ teachers provided information on students’ performance that was the same information provided to educational boards. Teachers also completed a validated questionnaire screening for emotional and behavioral problems and interviewed parents with a questionnaire covering medical history, headaches and other information.

The study found that 0.6 percent of the children had chronic migraine, or migraine on 15 or more days per month, 9 percent had episodic migraine, and 17.6 percent had probable migraine, which meant they met all but one of the criteria for migraine and did not meet the full criteria for any other type of headache syndrome.

The link between migraine and poor performance in school was even stronger for children with migraines that were more severe, lasted longer, or for children with chronic migraine, as well as for those who also had emotional or behavioral problems.

“With approximately one-fourth of school-age children having headaches with migraine features, this is a serious problem, especially for those with frequent, severe attacks that do not subside quickly,” Bigal said. “Parents and teachers need to take these headaches seriously and make sure children get appropriate medical attention and treatment.”

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/10/121029170810.htm

Health Tip: When Your Child is Stressed

(HealthDay News) – April 20, 2012Stress is a fact of life, and children are no less immune than their parents.

How can you recognize if your child is “stressed out?” The American Academy of Pediatrics mentions these possible warning signs:

  • Having physical problems, such as stomach ache or headache.
  • Appearing agitated, tired or restless.
  • Seeming depressed and unwilling to talk about his or her feelings.
  • Losing interest in activities and wanting to stay at home.
  • Acting irritable or negative.
  • Participating less at school, possibly including slipping grades.
  • Exhibiting antisocial behavior (stealing or lying), avoiding chores or becoming increasingly dependent on his or her parents.

Copyright © 2012 HealthDay. All rights reserved.

http://health.yahoo.net/news/s/hsn/health-tip-when-your-child-is-stressed

Web-Based Tool Produces Fast, Accurate Autism Diagnosis

ScienceDaily (Apr. 10, 2012)Researchers at Harvard Medical School have significantly reduced from hours to minutes the time it takes to accurately detect autism in young children.

The process of diagnosing autism is complex, subjective, and often limited to only a segment of the population in need. With the recent rise in incidence to 1 in 88 children, the need for accurate and widely deployable methods for screening and diagnosis is substantial. Dennis Wall, associate professor of pathology and director of computational biology initiative at the Center for Biomedical Informatics at Harvard Medical School, has been working to address this problem and has discovered a highly accurate strategy that could significantly reduce the complexity and time of the diagnostic process.

Wall has been developing algorithms and associated deployment mechanisms to detect autism rapidly and with high accuracy. The algorithms are designed to work within a mobile architecture, combining a small set of questions and a short home video of the subject, to enable rapid online assessments. This procedure could reduce the time for autism diagnosis by nearly 95 percent, from hours to minutes, and could be easily integrated into routine child screening practices to enable a dramatic increase in reach to the population at risk.

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Study questions antidepressant-suicide link

(Reuters Health) – February 17, 2012 – The Food and Drug Administration has a blanket warning on antidepressant medications stating they increase the risk of suicidal thoughts and behaviors among kids and young adults, but a new review of clinical data finds no link between suicide and at least two of the medications.

The new analysis, based in part on previously unpublished data, also concludes that treatment with antidepressants decreases the risk of suicide among adults of all ages.

“These results have to instill some additional confidence that prescribing these medications is not necessarily going to lead to suicidal thoughts or behavior,” said Robert Gibbons, a professor at the University of Chicago and lead author of the study, published in Archives of General Psychiatry.

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Second exam important in child sex-abuse cases

(Reuters Health) – January 30, 2011 – When a child is thought to have been sexually abused, a second medical exam may be key to picking up injuries and sexually transmitted infections, a study published Monday finds.

The American Academy of Pediatrics already recommends that kids being examined for sexual assault have a follow-up exam in the weeks afterward.

But until now, no studies had looked at the benefits of doing that.

For the new report, researchers reviewed the records of 727 children and teenagers who were evaluated for sexual abuse or assault over a five-year period.

They found that almost one-quarter of the time, the patients’ second exam changed the findings of the first.

In 18 percent of cases, there was a shift in the diagnosis of traumatic injuries.

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Children with HIV in Asia resistant to AIDS drugs

(Reuters – Hong Kong) – Dec. 01, 2011 – Teenagers in Asia receiving treatment for HIV are showing early signs of osteoporosis and children as young as five are becoming resistant to AIDS drugs, an anti-AIDS group said on Thursday, urging more attention be given to young HIV patients.

The finding, made available on World AIDS Day, is a reminder that while more people in Asia now have access to basic AIDS drugs, improved medicines remain out of reach and patients — both adults and children — still suffer from inadequate care.

In Asia, some 160,000 children are infected with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), which causes AIDS. Of these, 57,000 require treatment but only 30,000 were receiving it as of the end of 2008, according to UNICEF.

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Antipsychotic drugs tied to diabetes risk in kids

(Reuters Health) – November 22, 2011 – The antipsychotic drugs that are increasingly being used to treat bipolar disorder, autism and other mental disorders in children may come with an increased risk of diabetes, a new study suggests.

Previous research has linked the so-called second-generation antipsychotics to an increased risk of diabetes in adults. And there’s been some evidence that the drugs can cause weight gain in children.

The new findings, published in the journal Pediatrics, add to concerns that the medications may ultimately lead to diabetes in some kids.

Using records from three U.S. health plans, researchers found that children and teens who started on an antipsychotic had four times the risk of being diagnosed with diabetes, versus kids not using any psychiatric medication.

They developed diabetes at a rate of just over three cases per 1,000 children per year. That compared with just under 0.8 cases per 1,000 among medication-free kids.

Second-generation antipsychotics include drugs such as Risperdal, known generically as risperidone, Zyprexa (olanzapine), Seroquel (quetiapine) and Abilify (aripiprazole).

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Autism or Asperger’s? It might depend on your doctor

(Reuters Health) – November 07, 2011 – An autism diagnosis means different things depending on who is doing the diagnosing, suggests a new study.

Researchers found that clinics varied in what skills and behaviors they considered when evaluating kids with an autism spectrum disorder and deciding where on that spectrum they fell.

In kids with severe social problems, “everyone agreed that the child had (autism),” said study author Catherine Lord, head of the Institute for Brain Development at Weill Cornell Medical College and New York Presbyterian Hospital. “But it does suggest that in those borderlands of autism spectrum disorders, there is a lot of confusion.”

That means that families of kids with an autism spectrum disorder should focus more on a kid’s specific difficulties and strengths, rather than on a label, she said.

Those labels or classifications range from autism, on the more severe end of the spectrum, to Asperger syndrome, a milder disability, and “pervasive developmental disorder-not otherwise specified,” or PDD-NOS, for kids who struggle with communication and social interaction but don’t meet the symptom criteria for autism or Asperger’s.

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Clues to Young Children’s Aggressive Behavior Uncovered

ScienceDaily (Oct. 26, 2011) — Children who are persistently aggressive, defiant, and explosive by the time they’re in kindergarten very often have tumultuous relationships with their parents from early on. A new longitudinal study suggests that a cycle involving parenting styles and hostility between mothers and toddlers is at play.

The study was done by researchers at the University of Minnesota and appears in the journal Child Development.

The researchers looked at more than 260 mothers and their children, following them from the children’s birth until first grade. They assessed infants’ difficult temperament as well as how they were parented between the first week and the sixth month of life, based on both observations and parent reports. When the children were 2 and a half and 3 years old, the researchers watched mothers with their children doing tasks that challenged the children and required assistance from the parents. Finally, when the children were in kindergarten and first grade, researchers asked moms and teachers to rate the children’s behavior problems.

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More Children Visiting ERs for Psychiatric Care

FRIDAY, Oct. 14 (HealthDay News) — A growing number of American children are receiving psychiatric care in hospital emergency departments, particularly children who have no insurance or are covered by Medicaid.

That’s the finding of a new study that examined 279 million visits made by children to U.S. emergency departments from 1999 to 2007.

During that time, the rate of psychiatric visits increased from 2.4 percent to 3 percent. Underinsured children accounted for 46 percent of those visits in 1999 and 54 percent in 2007.

The findings, slated to be presented Friday at the American Academy of Pediatrics National Conference and Exhibition in Boston, are important for a number of reasons, according to study author Dr. Zachary Pittsenbarger.

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Stress Drives Alcoholics’ Children to Drink, Study Suggests

ScienceDaily (Sep. 24, 2011) — If either of your parents has a drink problem, there is a greater risk that you will consume more alcohol after stressful situations, reveals current research from the Sahlgrenska Academy, at the University of Gothenburg, Sweden.

It has long been known that alcoholics’ children are 50% more likely to have a drink problem in the future, and new research from the Sahlgrenska Academy is shedding new light on this link. Carried out by researcher Anna Söderpalm Gordh, the study has been published in the most recent issue of the journal Pharmacology Biochemistry and Behaviour.

The study involved 58 healthy people who were divided into two groups on the basis of whether they came from a family with a drink problem or not.

Both groups were randomly assigned to two experimental situations, one of which was more stressful and involved solving mathematical problems under timed conditions in public. The two groups were subsequently allowed to drink alcohol in an experimental consumption test or a placebo, depending on which situation they had been randomly assigned.

“The results show that people with parents who have a history of alcohol abuse drink more than others when exposed to stress,” says Söderpalm Gordh.

This behaviour can have negative consequences in the long term. It is no secret that people who consume large quantities of alcohol every time they drink run a higher risk of developing a dependency in the future.

“If alcohol relaxes you when you’re stressed, then you should try to find other ways of calming yourself down — relaxation exercises, for example,” says Söderpalm Gordh.

About Alcoholism

Alcoholism is usually divided into two categories: type I and type II. Type I is largely dependent on our genes’ interaction with the environment, for example the people we socialise with or the crises in our lives, while type II involves a considerable genetic risk of developing a drink problem, irrespective of our environment.

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/09/110920075518.htm

U.S. advisers urge FDA to address antipsychotics in kids

(Reuters) – Sept. 22, 2011 – U.S. pediatric health advisers on Thursday urged drug regulators to continue studying weight gain and other side-effects of antipsychotic drugs as they are increasingly taken by children.

Significant numbers of U.S. children are receiving drugs to tame aggression, attention deficit disorder and other mental problems, even though there is little conclusive data to show exactly how the medications work or whether they damage kids’ health.

The pediatric advisory panel on Thursday listened to preliminary results of a study sponsored in part by the FDA that, inconclusively still, compared whether some antipsychotic drugs put children at a higher risk of developing diabetes than others.

Similar to the recommendations the panel has made in previous years, it voted 16-1 to support the U.S. Food and Drug Administration‘s routine safety monitoring of the new generation of antipsychotics.

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Childhood Depression, Anxiety Tied to Pain in Adulthood

MONDAY, Aug. 1 (HealthDay News) — Children who experience abuse or other adversities and develop mental health disorders are at increased risk for chronic physical problems when they’re adults, according to a new study.

Researchers examined data from people in 10 countries included in the World Health Organization World Mental Health Surveys initiative. The team looked at anxiety disorders and depression in children and at the following childhood adversities: abuse, neglect, loss of a parent through death or other causes, divorce, parental substance abuse, parental criminal behavior, family violence and being poor.

Both anxiety and depression in childhood were associated with three chronic pain conditions in adulthood: osteoarthritis, chronic spinal pain (back or neck), and frequent or severe headache.

Physical abuse in childhood was associated with a number of chronic diseases in adulthood: heart disease, asthma, diabetes, osteoarthritis, chronic spinal pain and headache.

The greater the number of childhood adversities, the higher the risk of physical health problems in adulthood, the investigators found.

“These results are consistent with the hypothesis that childhood adversities and early-onset mental disorders have independent, broad-spectrum effects that increase the risk of diverse chronic physical conditions in later life,” concluded Kate M. Scott, of the University of Otago in Dunedin, New Zealand, and colleagues.

http://www.healthgrades.com/health-news/ArticleDetail.aspx?id=655347